Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Our {FAVE} Math Manipulatives


One of my all-time favorite content areas to teach is math. I LOVE teaching math! πŸ’œSo, when it was time to reinforce skills with my students, I would bring out all sorts of fun games and manipulatives I knew they were really going to love. These are simply a few of my all-time {FAVE} math manipulatives for elementary and middle school scholars.
Write & Wipe Demonstration Clock
Our kiddos turning the clock hands any which way they like and being able to write the time on the board it features, erase it, and do it all over, again! Time-telling skills are necessary for 1st grade+. Begin with the hour, then half-hour, 15-minute intervals, and then to the minute.
Linking Cubes
These cubes are phenomenal! They are very useful when teaching how to count by 1s, 2s, 3s, 5s, 10s, 20s, and so on. Children can also sort them by color, size of cube train, amount, etc. These skills are handy for life-long learning. 
Two-Color Counters
This is a little gift for preschoolers and the little ones in the elementary school level. These counters can be used to reinforce counting, sorting, basic addition, basic subtraction and more. 
Geometric Block Shapes
Learning about shapes, sides, vertices, or just want to have fun creating shape monsters? These geometric block shapes are perfect for any of these skills. They can be used to build things, also, and spark creativity and imagination.
Geoboards
A little something for our middle schoolers and older learners. Geoboards are a fun way to learn about symmetry, angles, fractions and other math skills that are necessary in building a strong math foundation.
Teddy Bear Counters
Lastly, this one is simply because they are so cute and fun to play with! Teddy bear counters are excellent for sorting by amount, color, size and more! Your little one, or students, will love playing with these and getting creative when playing family (mama, papa and baby bear).

As you can see, I absolutely LOVE πŸ’–playing with these fun math manipulatives and I encourage you and your little one (or students) to have fun with them, as well!

Happy teaching! πŸ–


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